Sign up
for Newsletter
Description

We are proud to present this very rare 1930 Mercedes-Benz Stuttgart Cabriolet C. This car has been in the same family since it was purchased in Germany in 1950  and then brought back to North Carolina  in 1955. The highlights of this wonderful car and its history are as follows:

  • The Original date of delivery was May 13 of 1930.
  • Purchased by Max Garrison while stationed in Germany as a Medic in the United State Air Force during the Korean War.
  • Garrison shipped this vehicle to the United Stated in the 1950s and titled in North Carolina in 1955 where it has spent the past nearly 70 years.
  • The car went through an 8 year meticulous restoration from the late 1980s to early 1990s.
  • One family owned for over 70 years.
  • Always stored in a climate controlled environment.
  • 6L 6-cylinder engine.
  • 3-speed manual transmission.

When Daimler and Benz entered into a community of interest in 1924, heated debates between the two companies were almost instantaneous and continual. While a common goal existed between the two companies, a contentious past between them was certain to cause riffs—and it did. Both agreed the company needed to produce a midsized car to service the sizeable and potentially lucrative midsize market, along with commercial, military and government interests, but reaching that common goal wasn’t going to be simple.

The initial effort would be the Stuttgart line of cars offered in various body styles with a 2.0L or 3.0L engine. Introduced at the 1926 Berlin Auto Show, these cars would be the first automobiles marketed under the new name of Mercedes-Benz and would largely become the backbone of the newly formed company’s future successes. Filling the gap between the 2.0L and 3.0L vehicles, in 1929, Mercedes-Benz introduced the Stuttgart 260 with a 2.6L inline 6-cylinder engine. A wonderful sales success, the Stuttgart line ushered the company into a solid future, providing a chassis for a variety of vehicles.

This 1930 260 Stuttgart Cabriolet C was delivered new on May 13, 1930 and delivered to Reutter, Stuttgart for bodywork. Powered by the 2.6L engine and a 3-speed manual transmission, the car was bought by Max Garrison while stationed in Germany as a US Air Force medic during the Korean War. He shipped the car to the U.S. in the 1950s, titling it in North Carolina in 1955. During the late 1980s and early 1990s, the car underwent an eight-year restoration that brought it back to an original state.

Presented in a light ivory hue with black fenders spanned by wooden running boards, the car sports a two-tone light and dark brown stripe and reddish-orange wheels with whitewall tires. Brightwork delicately sprinkles the bodywork with a chrome radiator surround, radiator mascot, chrome bumpers, windshield surround and more. The interior is upholstered in black, highlighted by an orange dashboard and wooden steering wheel. Nestled within the left and right sides of the windshield surround are semaphore turn signals. Stored in a climate-controlled environment, this 260 Stuttgart presents exquisitely well and is an exciting representation of one of the cars that made Mercedes-Benz a commercial success.

1930 Mercedes-Benz

1930 Mercedes-Benz 260 Stuttgart Cabriolet C

$125,000
STOCK

WN

Message Us (980) 216-8550
Description

We are proud to present this very rare 1930 Mercedes-Benz Stuttgart Cabriolet C. This car has been in the same family since it was purchased in Germany in 1950  and then brought back to North Carolina  in 1955. The highlights of this wonderful car and its history are as follows:

  • The Original date of delivery was May 13 of 1930.
  • Purchased by Max Garrison while stationed in Germany as a Medic in the United State Air Force during the Korean War.
  • Garrison shipped this vehicle to the United Stated in the 1950s and titled in North Carolina in 1955 where it has spent the past nearly 70 years.
  • The car went through an 8 year meticulous restoration from the late 1980s to early 1990s.
  • One family owned for over 70 years.
  • Always stored in a climate controlled environment.
  • 6L 6-cylinder engine.
  • 3-speed manual transmission.

When Daimler and Benz entered into a community of interest in 1924, heated debates between the two companies were almost instantaneous and continual. While a common goal existed between the two companies, a contentious past between them was certain to cause riffs—and it did. Both agreed the company needed to produce a midsized car to service the sizeable and potentially lucrative midsize market, along with commercial, military and government interests, but reaching that common goal wasn’t going to be simple.

The initial effort would be the Stuttgart line of cars offered in various body styles with a 2.0L or 3.0L engine. Introduced at the 1926 Berlin Auto Show, these cars would be the first automobiles marketed under the new name of Mercedes-Benz and would largely become the backbone of the newly formed company’s future successes. Filling the gap between the 2.0L and 3.0L vehicles, in 1929, Mercedes-Benz introduced the Stuttgart 260 with a 2.6L inline 6-cylinder engine. A wonderful sales success, the Stuttgart line ushered the company into a solid future, providing a chassis for a variety of vehicles.

This 1930 260 Stuttgart Cabriolet C was delivered new on May 13, 1930 and delivered to Reutter, Stuttgart for bodywork. Powered by the 2.6L engine and a 3-speed manual transmission, the car was bought by Max Garrison while stationed in Germany as a US Air Force medic during the Korean War. He shipped the car to the U.S. in the 1950s, titling it in North Carolina in 1955. During the late 1980s and early 1990s, the car underwent an eight-year restoration that brought it back to an original state.

Presented in a light ivory hue with black fenders spanned by wooden running boards, the car sports a two-tone light and dark brown stripe and reddish-orange wheels with whitewall tires. Brightwork delicately sprinkles the bodywork with a chrome radiator surround, radiator mascot, chrome bumpers, windshield surround and more. The interior is upholstered in black, highlighted by an orange dashboard and wooden steering wheel. Nestled within the left and right sides of the windshield surround are semaphore turn signals. Stored in a climate-controlled environment, this 260 Stuttgart presents exquisitely well and is an exciting representation of one of the cars that made Mercedes-Benz a commercial success.